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The wind and the Leaves

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  • Note
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"Come, little leaves," said the wind one day,
" Come over the meadows with me and play.


Put on your dresses of red and gold;
For summer is gone, and the days grow cold."

Soon as the leaves heard the wind's loud call,
Down they came fluttering, one and all.


O'er the brown field then they danced and flew
Singing the soft little songs they knew.

Dancing and whirling, the little leaves went,
Winter had called them, and they were content.


Soon, fast asleep on their earthy beds,
The snow laid a coverlet over their heads.

- George Cooper.

George Cooper (1840-1927) was an Americanpoet and song writer best known for his lyrics. He also translated the lyrics of German, Russian, Italian, Spanish and French musical work into English.



  • George Cooper an American poet (1840-1927) wrote this poem.
  • The poem explains about the leaves and the role of wind.
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Questions and Answers

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The  wind ask the leaves to come over the grassland to play.

The leaves look red and gold when they are old and ready to drop.

The leaves are satisfied to come down because winter called them for sleep.

In the winter after they went to earthy beds, snow lay the bedspread over them.

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  • The meaning of meadows is?

    sand
    grassland
    widow
    landmass
  • What do you mean by fluttering?

    strength
    moving lightly and quickly
    making trouble
    teasing
  • Synonym of content is?

    fast
    Bedspread
    Happy
    Satisfied
  • Coverlet means?

    Blanket
    Bedspread
    Improper
    Fans
  • You scored /4


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